Bugs, we’ve got bugs

I was hoping that once I used a different OEM’s mobile app I would be free of all the bugs that Ford’s MyFordMobile app had. To some extent that is true, but the myChevrolet app comes with its own set of bugs. Here is a good example of one:

2018-06-12 05.51.00

Note that the battery level is at 98% showing 252 miles to go (yup more than the EPA rated 238 on the Bolt–at 100% charge it read 265 miles on the GOM). Tapping “Ok” shows a map with the current location in the middle of the ocean somewhere (didn’t think to zoom out enough to see where in the ocean).

Not sure where the app is reading the location from (the phone, or the car) but in either case it doesn’t have the proper one. I’m guessing its the car because when I used the “save parking location” feature to grab the car’s location the above range warning stopped.

You’d also think that they would disable this message whenever the car is plugged in (it was charging at the time).

 

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Bugs, we’ve got bugs

Time flies…

Here we are, February 2018 already. Wow its been 2 years since I turned in the FFE (and 5 years since I picked it up).

So far 2 years on the C-Max: I’m averaging about 800-1000 miles on a “tank” of gas (in winter I burn a little more to generate heat). This usually means I’m getting gas about once a month. Which isn’t too bad all things considered.

In Ford news they did up their commitment to 40 electrified vehicles by 2022 still, however, they haven’t shown a single prototype, rendering, or anything for that matter. This means that when my C-Max lease is up in a year there won’t be anything available from Ford with a plug (assuming they stop making the Focus Electric, C-Max Energi, and Fusion Energi when the Focus plant switches over to Ranger production this year–Focus production is moving overseas).

Given that I have to start looking elsewhere for an EV to lease. The most logical one to choose would be a Chevy Bolt EV (given that it is A) available, and B) a bit less expensive than a Tesla Model 3). To that end we have a vacation coming up…perhaps I’ll try to rent one…hmmm.

 

Time flies…

A Tesla in the family

For the past few hours I’ve had this guy plugged into my home EVSE:

Tesla

A relative picked it up and will be visiting for a few days. Now my little 30A @ 240V charger really can’t do much for a Tesla (the Tesla app says its charging at about 20 miles an hour–for this afternoon they have been here long enough for maybe 60 miles of charge). Fortunately for them we do have a supercharger about 20 miles away (which they plan to hit on the way home).

I’ll likely have another post soon after I take it for a spin…

 

A Tesla in the family

Busy summer indeed

Now that fall is here I can start posting about weather and range issues again…! LOL Just kidding. What a busy summer around here with a few life changes thrown in to boot.

As far as the subject matter of the blog here: The C-Max is performing well, however I’ve been noticing some fit & finish issues with it (like any car these days). I’ve got a new commute that is a tad bit longer (+5 miles) than my last one (which brings my round trip mileage to 40 miles). I can still get by using a full charge for one trip on the commute (new job didn’t come with a charger, sadly).

We/I did take a few trips bringing the C-Max along for the ride (one family vacation, and one business trip). In both cases the C-Max was towed along behind the camper and I used the 50A RV plug at the campground to charge it up.

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The trusty Clipper Creek LCS-20P doing its thing.

This time no campground breakers were tripped LOL.

 

 

Busy summer indeed

EVs in the local news

Here is an interesting EV (well charging) article in Detroit’s local Free Press.

The Free Press has, typically, been a bit more friendly to EVs than Detroit’s other paper (The Detroit News). This article reflects that by being pretty balanced in its presentation (and its pretty long with some history to go with it).

In addition, AAA cited a study this week that said more than 30 million Americans are likely to buy an electric vehicle as their next car, although “more than half of Americans are hesitant to make the switch due to ‘range anxiety.'”

Note that I still don’t think “range anxiety” is a real thing–once you’ve owned and driven an EV you quickly realize what it can and cannot do. Therefore “range anxiety” just becomes something to fear for those that have never experienced an EV.

Companies like Ford and General Motors also tout their own workplace charging networks for employees. Ford says 1,600 employees have registered to use its campus charging network since it was launched in 2014, and that the company has 190 stations (164 in southeast Michigan with 20 more expected in the next month) at 50 locations in the U.S. and Canada. GM says it has more than 500 charging stations across more than 50 U.S. facilities.

Good on Ford–I’m pretty sure I posted about that when they made the announcement adding all the charging stations (at the time the only plugins available from Ford were, and are, the FFE and the Energi vehicles–about time they add some more eh?).

On the whole a pretty decent article (even providing resources to find charging stations)..take a little time to read it.

 

EVs in the local news

Feature request for Ford’s 300 mile SUV

Now that Ford is making a 300 mile SUV BEV here is a feature that I think would go a long way in making the battery last longer.

For the batteries in today’s EVs one of the killers is the number of cycles, and how long the battery is held at full charge (to alleviate the full charge problem many manufacturers really only charge the battery up to about 90%). On the Focus Electric (FFE) Ford also introduced “Value Charging”. Setup by location this feature allows the owner to basically set what time the car gets charged. Many FFE owners (including myself) used this feature so that the FFE would start charging early in the morning (in my case around 3:00 am or so) so that it was just fully charged when the preconditioning started (and just prior to leaving). On the FFE this was necessary because having only about 70 miles of range it needed to be charged up daily.

On an EV with 300 miles of range it may not be necessary to charge daily–in fact it is better for the battery if it only gets charged to full every 2nd or 3rd day (fewer cycles, and it isn’t held to a full charge for as long).

To solve this issue Ford should introduce a “minimum charge” setting to the value charge feature. This is an extra setting in addition to the charge window (e.g. charge from 3am – 9am). In fact the value charge feature could be tweaked slightly with a target time along with the minimum charge value.

Here is how it would work: Lets say you leave home to go to work every weekday around 7:00 am and your round-trip commute is 50 miles. You could set your home value charge settings to: 6:45am target time and a 33% minimum charge (33% battery = 100 miles or double your commute–giving you some extra driving miles).

This is what the car would do: If the current charge of the battery is above the minimum charge (say its at 45%) then the car would do nothing when plugged in (and if you have precondition set it would use the power from the EVSE for that). If, however, the car’s battery charge is less than the 33% minimum charge then it would charge the car during the value charge window (thus if the value charge window is 11:00pm to 6:45am it would charge the entire time). This would ensure that the car’s charge is above the minimum value set at the target time. It would also ensure that the car isn’t held at a full charge that often (there is no way a level 2 EVSE can charge to full a 300 mile EV in 8 hours).

Lets look at a few days: Suppose the car sat over the weekend and charged to full (since the value charge for Saturday and Sunday just says “charge away”).

  • No charging overnight Sunday-Monday
  • No charging overnight Monday-Tuesday as the car is at 75%
  • No charging overnight Tuesday-Wednesday as the car is at 45% (you did some extra driving around)
  • Charges overnight Wednesday-Thursday as the car was at 28%, but since it only charged for about 8 hours it only brought the battery up to ~60%
  • No charging overnight Thursday-Friday as the car was 35%

Ford should also keep the easy flip between Value Charge and Charge Now that the FFE has–that was really handy (my C-Max doesn’t have it and its a pain). The quick flip: When you turned off the FFE the right display would show a menu for a few seconds allowing you to flip the current charge location from Value Charge to Charge Now or back with a simple two button press (to do this in the C-Max requires a multi-step process on the center screen before shutting off).

As you can see above in the example this feature would reduce the number of weekly charge cycles from daily (7 or more) down to two or three and effectively manage the charge state of the battery automatically; all the owner would have to do is plug in every time they got home.  Easy peasy 😉

Feature request for Ford’s 300 mile SUV

You get electricity and you get electricity…woops

My 2nd post about combining two of my “hobbies”: EV Enthusiasm, and camping:

Since Ford forbids you from towing the FFE with even a single wheel on the ground I was never able to take it camping–except for one trip where the campground was within the FFE’s range (kind of boring).

The C-Max can be flat towed (we don’t have it setup for that) but that also means you can tow it on a dolly (what looks like the C-Max’s front wheel in this picture is really the dolly’s wheel–the C-Max is parked immediately behind the dolly).

What this also means is I finally get to try out my LCS-20p at a campground. Waaaay back when I first got the FFE I picked up the LCS-20p and made an adapter to work with the 50 amp plugs at campgrounds. (Our only camping trip with the FFE was before I wired up the adapter.)

Once we were all setup (as you see above) with everything plugged in and up and running I dug out the LCS-20p and plugged it in. It flashed all its LEDs as it went through the power on diagnostics and indicated everything was good–yaay that cable I wired up myself was correct.

With the car happily charging we went on with our business. Then about 30-40 minutes later…poof! No power. Uh oh? Was that me? Looking around all the breakers in the camper and out–nope they are all good. Hmmm. Then a neighbor pops their head up: “Do you have power?” “Nope” Wow multiple campsites are down? I don’t think its my cable? The car would not have been drawing much current (the C-Max only has a 3.3 kW charger, unlike the FFE with its 6.6 kW charger now that would have really brought down the system LOL).

A little while later the campground gets the power back up and running: A larger breaker blew for the entire lane we were on–right across the street from us. At this point I’m thinking: Ok it probably wasn’t me charging that caused it with it being a very hot & humid day but it is possible that my car was the little bit that pushed the breaker over the edge. So I decided to forgo any further charging on the car (it got up to 92% anyway more than enough for the weekend).

The next morning as we were getting ready to go out….pop! The breaker blew again. Ah ha! It wasn’t the car (wasn’t plugged in) LOL Knowing what was wrong I waited a few minutes for the breaker to cool, walked over and reset the breaker. A few minutes later a puzzled looking maintenance worker was asking everyone if they had power?? LOL

Now I’m ready for the next C-Max’ing camping trip… 🙂

 

 

You get electricity and you get electricity…woops